Black Incarceration: Johnson’s War on Crime, The RDL, and More

This entry is part 5 of 5 in the series How Whites Hold Blacks Back

(05-29-2018, updated 07-16-2018)  Crime in inner-city black neighborhoods and law enforcement response over time have seemingly made it a chicken-egg matter. Seemingly. I explained how inner city  black neighborhoods came into being to begin with. From the start cities responded to crime in black neighborhoods differently than in white areas.

The Racial Wealth Gap: Two Reports on Income and Asset Disparity

This entry is part 4 of 5 in the series How Whites Hold Blacks Back

(05-27-2018, updated 08-02-2018) Segregation held African Americans back until the Civil Rights Movement. There has been no institutional racism since, so they have no excuse for being less well off today, do they? And what about poor white people? Well, it just so happens that two recent reports dispute the myths about the wealth gap between whites and people of color.

What Do We Want Our Schools To Do? Discipline Or Teach?

This entry is part of 3 in the series Officer Slam: Police in School

(10-29-2015, updated 07-14-2018)  When and why did it become acceptable to have Officer Slam in school? And why is discipline seen as the be-all, end-all in American public education? If you had asked me last week what a school resource officer was, I wouldn't have known, but my guess would have been someone who was somehow involved in directing students to the appropriate resources for whatever they needed, be it the school library, the counselor, a local college, whatever. But no, SROs--School Resource Officers--are police officers who have been placed in public schools "to keep the students safe".

Spring Valley High School Student Violently Arrested in Class

This entry is part of 3 in the series Officer Slam: Police in School

(10-28-2015, updated 07-14-2018) If you're black in a public high school in South Carolina, using your phone in class can be extremely dangerous. When a sixteen-year-old girl at Spring Valley High School in South Carolina was caught with her phone, the teacher told her to hand it over. She refused. The teacher then ordered her to go to the principal's office. She refused.The teacher called the assistant principal, who then told her to leave the classroom. She refused. So the assistant principal sicced the cop--excuse me, I mean School Resources Officer Ben Fields--on her.